That’s Amore: Zero Wedding

After the after party we had another after party, karaoke!

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But Mr. G and I were too busy looking at photos our friends had posted on Facebook to sing.

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We later got back to our hotel and opened all of our wedding gifts.  In Japan,  a typical wedding gift is an envelope with either $100 or $300 (never $200 as a that can be easily divided and considered unlucky). We dumped all of the envelopes on the bed and started going through them.  We counted all of the money in the envelopes- it was about $12,000. “Getting married in Japan is awesome!” I told Mr. G after counting out the money.

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A sampling of all our wedding gift envelopes.

Many couples in Japan try to have a “zero-wedding.”  A zero- wedding is when the bride and groom try to have a wedding that costs the estimated amount of money that they plan to receive from their guests. So let’s say you have 200 guests. You can expect everyone to give you about $100 or $300 for you wedding, the average of those two numbers being about $200. So 200 guests times $200 would mean you could technically have a $40,000 dollar wedding without paying for anything out of pocket.

Mr. G and I were not expecting to have a zero wedding. Our wedding had many foreign guests who aren’t aware of the monetary gift tradition so we knew we wouldn’t get as much money as other couples who have wedding receptions with  all Japanese guests. This was fine with us. We were in no way disappointed by the money we had received. It was actually way more than I expected!

What would you prefer to have for wedding gifts? Cash to pay off the wedding or actual wedding gifts?

So did Mr. G and I have a zero -wedding? Next up: The Budget!

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Miss a recap?

We have our rehearsal dinner,.

We set up the venue,

We do our first look and family photos.

The sushi at cocktail hour was great.

We blatantly copy the internet. 

Our boss gives a speech.

We say Kampai!

We cut the cake.

A quick guide to Japanese wedding receptions.

My bouquet toss was an epic fail.

I change my dress. 

Our guests ate and drank.

There were tears. 

We had a receiving line.

We had an after-party.

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