Our Fancy Toilet

I’m sure most people have heard about the amazingness that is a Japanese toilet. Let me let you, it’s all true.

BOUGHT-JAPANESE-WASHLET

Fancy Japanese toilets, often referred to as Washlet toilets,  are pretty great. They have seat warmers, nozzles that spray warm water at your bottom, a bidet function, and a power deoderizer. Some Japanese toilets even play music for you while you go. Seriously, I cannot hear the song “When the Saints Go Marching In” without thinking of the toilets at my university, Kansai Gaidai, as that was the song that the toilets played while you used them.

The toilet in our home is a typical Japanese toilet. It has all the buttons I mentioned previously and a faucet at the top that spouts out water when you flush the toilet so you can wash your hands.

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My first apartment that Masa and I lived in had a fancy Washlet toilet with a faucet. I suggested we put a bottle of soap on the basin and Masa let me know that we couldn’t do that as it would ruin the toilet’s plumbing. This confirmed one of the suspicions that I had been having for a long time. When it comes to using soap and water after the bathroom, some Japanese people consider it  unnecessary.

In most Japanese homes, the toilet has its own room. Smaller apartments, however, will have the toilet, tub, and sink all in one room.  We have a basket of books in ours and decorated the wall with a cherry blossom wall decal from Ikea.

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Have you ever experienced a washlet toilet? If you do, make sure the first button you identify is the “stop” button or you could make a nice little fountain in your toilet.

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5 thoughts on “Our Fancy Toilet

  1. a) Chuckling at the musical selection
    b) I suppose when the commode is doing all that for you, soap might not be so necessary after all
    c) The suggestion to find the “stop” button reminds me of the scene from Cars2 where the tow truck had just that problem.

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